Bought And Paid For (Five Sentence Fiction, September 2012)

This week’s prompt from Lillie McFerrin’s Five Sentence Fiction was the word ‘Memories’. 

 

The rays of the setting sun were diffused by the elm trees that bordered the garden, dappling  golden orbs of sunlight over the little girl squatting on the paving stones.

Around her lay a mound of rose petals, pink, red, white and yellow, still soft and pliant as she crushed them into the neck of the medicine bottle filled with water.

Once the bottle was full, she began to shake it vigorously, pausing every now and then to remove the stopper and sniff at the contents; maybe tomorrow, she reflected, it would begin to smell more like her mother’s exotic perfumes.

Now a grown woman, she sat before her dressing table, surrounded by flowers, silks, satins and velvet, cautiously waving the prussian-blue bottle beneath her nostrils, and remembering the furore that day, after her parents had discovered how she had decimated the blooms in their prized rose garden.

‘There is,’ she reflected sadly, ‘always a heavy price to pay for perfume’, as the man who now owned her slipped his arms around her body and nuzzled her slender neck with fleshy lips.

 

 

About Sandra

I used to cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and wrote fiction and poetry. Now I live on the beautiful Dorset coast, enjoying the luxury of being able to have a cat, cultivating an extensive garden and getting involved in the community. I still write fiction, but only when the spirit moves me - which isn't as often as before. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
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15 Responses to Bought And Paid For (Five Sentence Fiction, September 2012)

  1. lisashambrook says:

    Perfect image for memories, scent is so evocative…and at some point we’ve probably all done the rose perfume thing as little girls, I just never got to move on to the expensive stuff!

    Like

  2. sue Cottrill says:

    Been there – done that . The funny things we do as children.

    Like

  3. Sandra says:

    I seem to recall chopping stones to make a fine powder too, but I can’t for the life of me think why! I think (unsuccessfully) trying to make perfume out of rose petals is a lesson we have to learn – you can’t fully re-create nature.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Andrew says:

    Lovely. The ending is not lost on me.

    Like

  5. TheOthers1 says:

    It started so innocent. I even looked at the title after I started reading and thought, this won’t end well.” I wonder the garden paths that led her where she is. Well done

    Like

  6. vbholmes says:

    I like the way you started with a peaceful scene which ended with the girl paying a price by incurring her parents’ anger and then repeated the mood only to finish it off with a far more onerous price tag. Good descriptions, good story.

    Like

  7. Kate says:

    Definitely sparked memories for me and what a lovely image to go with it.

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  8. Sandra says:

    Thanks Kate, glad you liked it.

    Like

  9. Not at all the end I expected. Awesome job!!!

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  10. Sarah Mac says:

    There’s such an innocence in the first part of the story in complete contrast the weary resignation of the second part. Really well thought out!

    Like

  11. ahblack57 says:

    The lure of perfume and innocence lost (or should that be inno-scents?). An intriguing tale. thanks for sharing it.

    Like

I'd love to hear your views; it reassures me I'm not talking to myself.

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