He Ain’t Heavy… (Friday Fictioneers, February 2013)

Photo courtesy of David Stewart

“Aw Dad!”

“Not unless your brother goes too.”

“But he’s too young, he’ll hold us back.”

“You don’t go without him son, and that’s final.”

All my life… the same story.  David couldn’t run, was no good at sport.  He couldn’t even get a girl, so he was always hanging around me and mine.

And now he sits by my bedside, high-fives me and winks.

“Way to go, Pete.  See you when you come round.”

We were forced to share so much when we were kids.  But nobody had to ask twice for him to share his bone marrow with me.

Friday Fictioneers is kicking off again.  Why not join us, great photo from David Stewart showing the statue at the south gate of Jeonju, South Korea.  (I must have googled just about every statue in China, Japan and Thailand and was just about to start on Korea when I decided to wing it for this week.  🙂



About Sandra

I cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and write fiction and poetry. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers, Just Sayin' and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

111 Responses to He Ain’t Heavy… (Friday Fictioneers, February 2013)

  1. theothers1 says:

    Aw, this ended in a sweet way. Siblings are support no matter how annoying they were as kids.

    Like

  2. Dear Sandra,
    Maybe he ain’t heavy, but your story is although not in a maudlin way. Beautifully written as I’ve come to expect from you.
    Shalom,
    Rochelle

    Like

  3. deanabo says:

    Sad and beautiful all in one.

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  4. kz says:

    awwww this is so sweet… very beautiful story about brotherly love…

    Like

  5. Sandra says:

    This takes bromance to another level! Beautiful, Sandra.

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  6. This was really sweet. It’s nice to know that even kids who fight a lot and don’t get along can grow up to be best friends. I’ve seen that sort of thing a lot in my own life. I kept feeling like it must be about me, but I don’t have a brother. 😉

    Like

  7. muZer says:

    Awww.. that’s such a touching story. Sibling rivalry and love all in 100 words.

    Like

  8. I must reiterate what has been said already “Awww…”

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  9. Dear Sandra,

    Hats off to you for a superb take on the prompt. You’re getting faster, more prolific and have always been good.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    Like

  10. yerpirate says:

    Only you can write with such intensity in your words, week in and week out. Really you reached for our guts with this one! Very powerful piece – to say the least. Really I am stunned, and will read other stories tomorrow.

    Like

  11. yerpirate says:

    Reblogged this on Tea with a Pirate.

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  12. After an afternoon of mediating brotherly disputes, I appreciate your story very much. Nice work, Sandra!

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  13. I could see my own boys in this. Thank you Sandra.

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  14. Guess we do all things with those we love. We cry together, hate, be angry, argue, have fun, enjoy being and having a confidante…. Your writing expresses all of that in such a profound and sincere way… I loved it… Well done to you..

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  15. Sandra, what a sweet, unexpected story. I love the winking. Hist brother came through for him. Nice.

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  16. nightlake says:

    the brother’s altruism..so well expressed

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  17. Beautifully done, Sandra. Wonderful take 🙂

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  18. Iris says:

    I like how implicitly, the elder brother acknowledges that he might have been a little more patient with his younger sibling. I like his voice. Very nicely done, Sandra!

    Like

  19. Tom Poet says:

    He ain’t heavy he’s my brother…..Now the song is stuck in my head. Great work as always.

    Tom

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  20. Very touching story. You done did good!! 🙂

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  21. vb holmes says:

    I have a friend whose entire family stood in line to donate their bone marrow–his sister was the closest match and he’s been doing beautifully for ten years. Modern medicine is wonderful–as is your story of brotherly love, Sandra.

    Like

  22. Sheila says:

    This really shows how love can change and grow through the years, and I think that’s especially true with siblings. It’s funny how we can go from being so annoyed with a little brother or sister to feeling like we would do anything for them.

    Like

  23. lindarigsbee says:

    Ohhhh! I like that! Great job!

    Like

  24. tedstrutz says:

    Wow… this is a nice story, Sandra. One of those ones where you are thinking “where is this going”… I like where it went.

    Like

  25. Jan Brown says:

    Very powerful, very poignant. Nicely done!

    Like

  26. Beautiful. You took me down a road then steered me to a different path. Some bonds run deep, despite the bumps, and you portrayed it beautifully..

    Like

  27. erinleary says:

    I felt the strength of their bond. I know what it feels like to fight and love my siblings, sometimes all in the same afternoon.

    Like

  28. Anne Orchard says:

    Yes, perspectives can change enormously in adulthood, as you showed us in this beautiful story. Something to keep in mind when the kids are fighting (not that they do it much, more a case of sarcasm).

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  29. As I anticipated, another great tiny tale from you, Sandra. I love the shifts in perspective in this story.

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  30. Great story, well told! (But of course, I don’t remember any song that you might be referring to ….)

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  31. unspywriter says:

    Wonderful story. I faced a mildly similar situation when my brother had near kidney failure. He hesitated to ask, I knew, so I offered, and you’ve captured and presented all those complex emotions in a short but powerful piece. Thank you.

    Here’s mine: http://unexpectedpaths.com/friday-fictioneers/suzuki-method/

    Like

  32. rgayer55 says:

    What a beautifully told and touching story. I’m sure the little brother didn’t hesitate when the need arose. Like Tom, I’ll be humming that old Hollies tune all day.

    Like

  33. Joe Owens says:

    The love of a brother or a sister is like no other. Sacrifices for others are just the normal fare as love is shared in the family.

    Like

  34. annisik51 says:

    Touching story Sandra. Well told. I know someone to whom this happened. It was just at the point in time when bone marrow transplanting began. My friend had been written off. His wife gave birth to their second child in the same hospital at the same time he received his brother’s bone marrow.

    Like

  35. elappleby says:

    What a sweet story – and so true to life. It’s exactly how my kids behave. Thankfully, they haven’t had to deal with anything as serious as bone marrow transplants though. Brilliant writing.

    Like

  36. Hayley says:

    So sweet! You definitely captured that sibling love/hate relationship. We may beat each other up most of the time, but when it comes down to it we’re always there for each other.

    Like

  37. t says:

    Nice take on this one – plus I really enjoyed the read =)

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  38. Very very nice Sandra. Really touch my heart. 🙂

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  39. What a warm use of that photo – very original!

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  40. Sarah Ann says:

    Oh wow. You did it again, sent me off one way and then brought me up short. Great last line.

    Like

  41. denmother says:

    Reaching out to save a brother. An inspired take on the prompt. I’m amazed that we both started our stories with “Aw dad” and took them in completely different directions. Creative writing rocks!
    Denmother

    Like

  42. Parul says:

    If you get along with your siblings, that bond is unparalleled in this entire universe in my opinion.
    Your story made me happy and sad.. A sweet ache of sorts. Very interesting interpretation of the prompt.

    Like

  43. billgncs says:

    Hi Sandra — I enjoyed that positive view. Life is more complex and precious than we imagine.

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  44. rich says:

    sweetly done. in this line: “David couldn’t run, was no good at sport.” i think it should be “sportS.” instead of “sport.”

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      I’m a Brit, Rich. That’s what we say. In British English (and apparently places with direct British influence on the language) sport is used for general sporting activities. Certainly most British newspapers headine their sporting section with the word Sport in the singular as does the BBC, : seehttp://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/academy/default.stm. I’m relaxed about whether it’s sport or sports in this instance, but rather less so about the general concept of adapting my native language for demographic reasons. 🙂

      Like

  45. Sunshine says:

    i love your story, Sandra…no matter how much battles we give and take with our siblings, went it comes to important stuff…love usually overcomes it all. heart warming. ♥

    Like

  46. k~ says:

    What a great title for this heart enveloping story. I didn’t see the end coming, but it played so well on the personalities of siblings like this. I really liked this Sandra.

    Like

  47. You’ve perfectly captured what the sibling relationship is all about. Excellent!

    Like

  48. Bee says:

    I love this story, Sandra. It’s so compact yet fully developed. Great take on the prompt!

    Like

  49. elmowrites says:

    Great title, Sandra, and a nice switch around at the end. If I had one suggestion, it would be to make the reveal more subtle – the rest is a great example of “show don’t tell”.

    Like

  50. wmqcolby says:

    You done great, Sandra! I stayed away this time, but I know your stories are “appointment stories” (as are Anne’s as well) and need to see what you did … and did it WELL, you did! (?)
    Anyway, great story!

    Like

  51. claireful says:

    Very touching. Lovely story Sandra.

    Like

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