The Midday Sun (Friday Fictioneers, October 2013)

Copyright Janet M Webb

It’s a grey, damp day here in the UK with heavy rain forecast for most of the day.  I’m on dog-care duties today, and with an eight month old puppy to keep occupied, I shall resign myself to getting wet in an effort to divert her from mischief.  Still, apart from the lovable mutt, there’s always Friday Fictioneers to brighten the day.

Friday Fictioneers invites a 100 word (or thereabouts) story in response to a weekly photographic prompt.  The beach is patrolled each week by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields, for which we are all suitably grateful.

The flotilla dotting the horizon had left the shoreline littered with trailers, trolleys, boxes… the detritus used for transporting the most-prized valuables from their luxury villas to the hired boats.

Jake smiled.  So easy;  just a few veiled hints… an ‘unconfirmed rumour’ inspired by the mangy mutt hanging around his barn and the Grockles had panicked.

Time now to salvage what they’d left behind.

A low rumble disturbed the now deserted beach, and he turned.

He froze, noticing as though in slow motion the flecks of foaming spittle that flew into the air as the dog launched itself towards him.

About Sandra

I cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and write fiction and poetry. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers, Just Sayin' and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

88 Responses to The Midday Sun (Friday Fictioneers, October 2013)

  1. Hmm, harsh punishment for a chap just trying to make a living!
    Great piece of writing.

    Like

  2. Excellent piece Sandra. Very well constructed.

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  3. Dear Sandra,

    Sounds like you have canine on your mind. I envision a boxer there at the end. Big dog. I love the picture you so vividly painted for us.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  4. howanxious says:

    As you sow, so shall you reap.
    I guess, that is all about it. Very good setting and well-written. 🙂
    -HA

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  5. gingerpoetry says:

    Puh, this was hard work for me, a lot of unknown words – but I got it at the end. A strong story with a really scary ending –
    liebe Grüße
    Carmen

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  6. Locomente says:

    I loved the flow…
    Good one!

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  7. kz says:

    well, he did a pretty bad thing, so…
    great writing and i love that i learned a new word 🙂

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  8. dmmacilroy says:

    Dear Sandra,

    Thank you for ‘Grockles’ and for another delightfully wicked story from your fertile imagination. I can see you out walking the puppy and conjuring up rumor, flight and sudden death at the hands of a rabid canine. You really are too good at this. (Lucky for us!)

    Aloha,

    Doug

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      You’re welcome Doug. 🙂 I had a good day with the pup but was pleased to hand it back late afternoon – there’s only so much ball-throwing a writer’s mind can accommodate. Thank you for reading.

      Like

  9. H. Ken Abell says:

    Good dog? Bad dog? Now, were you aware that one of the symptoms of rabies is hydrophobia? Was that a deliberate connection, or just a nice coincidence?

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  10. elmowrites says:

    Oooh, a story from the dark side, vividly described, Sandra. That will teach him a lesson or two! I liked Grockles too, really added to the voice.

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  11. No bad deed goes unpunished (at least this time.) Written so well, casual and slightly wicked at the beginning, grim at the end. Being continuously wet has obviously not damped your writing skills.

    janet

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  12. Lynda says:

    I guess the mutt didn’t care for being slandered. After all, how is he going to get all the good handouts if everyone is afraid of him? I liked your twist ending and the new vocabulary!

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  13. I guess aversion to water is part of rabies… or … ?

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  14. Turnabout is fair play
    well written piece Sandra

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  15. I guess that pet sitting duty has inspired you! And our friends on the beach shall get their just desserts!

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  16. Linda Vernon says:

    Hmm . . . when visualization backfires! This is a really good twist, Sandra, and, of course, the writing is top notch!

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  17. Chilling, thrilling and well written.

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  18. Hi Sandra,
    You’ve expanded my vocabulary by one colorful, guttural word. I take it from the context of use in your story that grackle has a somewhat negative connotation. But still, their dogs love them! Ron

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  19. Of course, I meant grackle.

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  20. OMG, my fingers refuse to type it. Grockle, grackle, grackle.

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  21. Great description of the dog attack.

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  22. Sandra says:

    Thanks Dawn. 🙂

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  23. zookyworld says:

    Methinks that rumor might now be confirmed. I had to click on grockle to find out the meaning — thanks for the link. Fitting for Jake’s attitude, and his plan was certainly clever. Great twist to give the mangy mutt the last word.

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  24. Adam Ickes says:

    I do love a well deserved mauling. As long as I’m not the one being mauled that is. Well done, Sandra.

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  25. JackieP says:

    Well he should have kept in mind the saying about ‘Karma is a ……’. Teach him. Excellent story Sandra! As usual. 🙂

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  26. rheath40 says:

    I could see it all unfolding as I read it. Fantastic.

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  27. vbholmes says:

    Never underestimate a crafty canine. Jake was greedy–refused to split the goods.

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  28. erinleary says:

    I wonder if the word Grockles is related to the name of the bird, grackle. It’s what I first thought of when I read your story – then clicked through to the definition and realized it was tourists. I looked up some information on grackles and found this, which seemed especially apt. “Grackles tend to congregate in large groups, popularly referred to as a plague. This enables them to detect birds invading their territory, and predators, which are mobbed en masse to deter the intruders.” sounds like tourists to me…..

    Fun story, loved the dog. I can send you mine any time you’d like.

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    • Sandra says:

      That was interesting, never heard of grackles. But the description seems to fit…:)
      I’ll pass on the dog… one day a week does it for me. Thanks for reading Erin.

      Like

  29. Jan Brown says:

    I want to say, “Good dog!” but I don’t know if I should reveal my vengeful side….

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  30. claireful says:

    What goes around comes around? Great idea this week Sandra, and as always beautifully executed.
    Claire

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  31. Mike says:

    A great story. Long time since I’ve heard the term ‘Grockle’. Once had friends living in Devon and it’s what they called me when I visited!

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  32. Wow! Was he French dog? Ours aren’t like that!

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  33. annisik51 says:

    ‘Grockle’ is a new word for me and I live in S E England; though I am a northerner. The weather here is nice. Yesterday was so warm and sunny I skived from my work and did some gardening.
    Another great tale, Sandra. I like the ‘foaming spittle’ bit. It’s a good expression both to describe a dog and suggest a sea at the same time. Clever. Ann

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  34. Dee says:

    The flecks of foaming spittle… great images you conjured up there. Great job Sandra 🙂

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  35. dreaminofobx says:

    Must have been overseas grockles who didn’t know the UK has been rabies-free since the beginning of the 20th century (according to the NHS)!! Great take on the prompt. 🙂

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    • Sandra says:

      I think it’s DEFRA who are claiming we are rabies-free. My own two dogs went through the six month quarantine period back in 2000; thankfully the rules have relaxed slightly since then. Glad you liked the story.

      Like

  36. hugmamma says:

    I felt those flecks of foaming spittle as they flew right at me…hitting me between the eyes. Great imagery!

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  37. Great imagery. I’d hate to be the one that dog was after. Scary thought.

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  38. draliman says:

    Ha, that’ll teach him! Great story.
    Like your use of the word “grockle”. Since we Cornish just have to be different, we use the word “emmet”!

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  39. wmqcolby says:

    Loved that first line. I could actually see it as written. Good story and, especially the dog. I had to laugh seeing a dog flying through the air. Fantasy on your part (a.k.a. “frustration,” maybe?)

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    • Sandra says:

      Fantasy… that’s where I live. 😉 I’d love to be able to have a dog again but we travel so much it wouldn’t be fair. And trying to hang onto this puppy’s coat-tails is making me wonder whether I might not opt for an older dog when we stop travelling so much.

      Like

  40. Sounds like boy who cried dog. I guess he got his reward for it.

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  41. camgal says:

    Excellently worded, good moral too 🙂 Nice job

    Like

  42. pattisj says:

    I’m always amazed how quickly you get your story in, and you write something so deep and twisted! Nice work.

    Like

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