Water, water… everywhere

DSCF3891Twenty four hours of solid, heavy rainfall, has been followed by two days of persistent heavy showers. La Saone, from Auxonne to Lyon, and Le Rhone from Lyon down to Avignon is under yellow alert. Le Rhone has been closed to pleasure-boaters.

For the moment we are stuck at Seurre, watching La Saone streaming past our bow, liberally carpeted in logs, branches and general detritus from upstream, a sizeable amount of which has found its way to lodge behind our boat.

From time to time, we venture out with boathooks to pole the heavier and bulkier items away from the prop, and every now and then we have a little light exercise and entertainment as we help other boaters trying to moor on the finger pontoons, which are nicely placed to get the full benefit of the current swirling downstream. Those who aim to moor at the 1st pontoon upstream generally find themselves eventually swept down to the seventh pontoon. It’s not an exact science!

On the plus side, stormy weather does offer the opportunity for some great photography.

And last night’s sunset combined with another heavy shower offered a spectacular rainbow opportunity.

We were sure the level would have dropped overnight, but it’s now reached the flood marker board and we’ve resigned ourselves to a third night at Seurre, when by now we should have been 90 kilometres north of here.

Truly, we’re messing about on the river right now. 

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About Sandra

I cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and write fiction and poetry. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
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25 Responses to Water, water… everywhere

  1. Francesca Smith says:

    Those pictures are beautiful!

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  2. Dear Sandra,

    These photos are amazing. You’re a lucky lady. Thank you for sharing with us.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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  3. Beautiful photos Sandra. Stay safe

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  4. Sandra, messing about in boats for people isn’t always what it was for the animals, is it? You did get some gorgeous photos, but I imagine it’s quite frustrating to be stuck there for so long. We’re having a rainy day here, too, but it’s only keeping me from walking outside. I’m on my way to the basement and the weight bench and then a day of errands, etc.

    Take care, enjoy, and hopefully you’ll be off soon.

    janet

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    • Sandra says:

      Hi Janet! It’s frustrating – we have such a long way to go if we’re to stick to our plan, but at least we’re in a village where we there is a boulangerie, charcuterie and epicerie. It doesn’t always happen that way when the weather turns against you. 🙂 Take care yourself, Janet, don’t work too hard.

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  5. Those are lovely pictures. Truly there are plusses and minuses. 🙂

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    • Sandra says:

      Yes, as soon as the sunset developed last night all those moored here were up on deck, cameras at the ready. It brought a smile to some otherwise gloomy faces. 🙂

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  6. Joyce says:

    Beautiful photos. Lots of rainfall can I’m sure cause problems in places for you as you said. I still remember how bad our big flood was here in northern Colorado two years ago and the devastation it caused and the state and local governing bodies are still working to repair and rebuilt in places. Our rivers, especially our Big Thompson roared down into town like an ocean gone mad. Today, we are getting a nice, steady light drizzle of rain needed so we don’t have the opposite effect with the ground too dried up and drought that makes for more wildfires in the mountains.

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    • Sandra says:

      In France, Joyce, the floods are swift to rise and dissipate. There’s not the monumental damage that you get in the States when it can take years to rebuild. Thankfully. Glad that you’re in more moderate climate at the moment. Take care.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joyce says:

        There is a crazy pattern of storms and temp. changes always here in the U.S. with them coming at alarming rates and frequency anymore. Not so much like what I remember when growing up here as a child.

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        • Sandra says:

          We find the weather much more unpredictable in France than in the UK. The storms are more frequent/violent, and the rain much heavier, but unlike the UK it can change very quickly.

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    • Hello Joyce, your comment has me wondering if you are near Lyons. My brother’s family lives there and suffered terribly through the big flood. They still have areas of highway which are under construction and I think their well is still contaminated. Feast or famine. We were always scared their house would burn down from the wildfires, never expecting floods.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Joyce says:

      Hello, Silver in the Barn. We live in Loveland (Colo.) and got so much devastation and destruction up here from the 2013 flood, especially from the rising and overflowing Big Thompson river with the extra flowing down from Estes Park. But, we also went through Lyons one day after the flood to see their damage and saw highway 36 really washed out and messed up and they too had houses that just fell into the St. Vrain river as we had the same happen up here with cabins and homes washed out and falling into the Big T. river. We are getting rain forecasted here for the whole week and have already had some for a few days. They have already closed parts of our rec/bike trails again by the Big T. Does not look good at this point if it continues without letup.

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  7. Hi Sandra, naturally my thoughts turn, as ever, to food. Are you well-stocked? Ample supply of wine? Enough books? Still, I would be craving the sun by now. The rainbow shots are particularly nice. Here’s to the sun breaking out soon so you can be on your way again.

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    • Sandra says:

      Hi Barbara, yes thanks we’re fine for food. And wine? Well what do you think? The books are going to be a problem though. I brought one book for every week we were due to be away, and I’m more than halfway through the supply now. Time will lie heavy on my hands once I’m through the remainder – maybe I’ll just have to write one instead. 🙂

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  8. bob mackey says:

    Sandra:
    I hope you’ve been able to get moving by now. I look forward to arriving on May 30 to pick up a hire boat in Pontailler-sur-Saone. I hope milder conditions will prevail by then. We will have three weeks in the area. Will keep an eye open for the Castelsarrasin. Thanks for your stories and photos.

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  9. bob mackey says:

    Sandra:
    I hope you’ve been able to get moving by now. I look forward to arriving on May 30 to pick up a hire boat in Pontailler-sur-Saone. I hope milder conditions will prevail by then. We will have three weeks in the area. Will keep an eye open for the Désormais. Thanks for your stories and photos.

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    • Sandra says:

      Hi Bob, thank you for making contact. I’m sure the whether will be beautiful by then, early summer generally is around here. We passed through Pontailler last Friday, overnighting on the quay just below the entrance to the hire-boat base. It’s a lovely town with lots of good restaurants. Then we turned onto the Canal Entre Champagne-Bourgogne and made our way up to the tunnel at the summit and are now coming down the other side. After that we’ll turn onto the Marne au Rhin and then come down the Canal de Vosges so if you’re not heading south down the Saone, our paths will probably cross. The VNF service along the Champagne-Bourgogne is the best I’ve ever seen. I’ll probably have published a report on this leg of the journey (Champagne-Bourgogne) by the time you set off as I intend to do this trip in a series of three separate reports. I hope you have a lovely time, and that the weather is all you’re hoping for. Happy cruising.

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  10. bob mackey says:

    Sandra: Thanks for your guidance and suggestions. We will first head south on the Saone and west to Chagny where we expect to meet up with our friends on Wanderlust https://bargewanderlust.wordpress.com/
    We don’t know where we will go next, The general plan is stay close to the Burgundy vineyard areas, so we may turn back to the north and see you one day. Eventually we will have to drop the boat at Louhans, so we probably won’t make it far enough north to make a loop. More likely an out-and-back. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Pingback: Canal Champagne et Bourgogne (Canal de l’Est), May 2015 | castelsarrasin

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