This Ship Has Sailed – Friday Fictioneers, September 2015

Copyright Jennifer Pendergast

He’s shouting at her, as she stares blankly at the rope in her hands.

“Lasso the bollard, woman. Like I showed you.”

She closes her eyes and throws – to a sarcastic cheer.

Yessss!

Tying the rope off, she steps off the boat onto the lockside, encouraged that she can remember which buttons to press.

“Get back on board, cretin,” he shouts, as the lock begins to empty. “Untie your rope.”

Sod off, she thinks, walking away.

Glancing over her shoulder at the cruiser now dangling vertically from its bow in the lock, she concludes, with satisfaction, that the relationship may now have grounded.

 

I’m not sure whether you need to know about boating to understand this; I hope not.  We’re back on the water now and heading upstream as I write, under cloudless blue skies with a chilly wind whipping across the river.  Thanks to Rochelle the captain of the Friday Fictioneers ship for her continued selfless service.

About Sandra

I cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and write fiction and poetry. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers, Just Sayin'. Bookmark the permalink.

71 Responses to This Ship Has Sailed – Friday Fictioneers, September 2015

  1. Dear Sandra,

    I love the boat terms, but I could pretty much figure it out. Should I feel guilty that I laughed at the end and felt somewhat triumphant for her? Nah. Good one.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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  2. I don’t know boating but it made perfect sense to me.

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  3. good on her. There is a tinge of realism in this. You haven’t done this in one of your many lock transits. 🙂

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  4. Ha, I almost imagine you have seen this happen.. locks are great to break the wedlock. 🙂

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  5. Nice interaction. Serve him right!

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  6. What a great way to end a relationship. I am guessing he deserved this!

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  7. Kir Piccini says:

    Sometimes being grounded is the only way to sail….away from men like that.

    BRAVO.

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  8. I think you are right about the grounding of the relationship. That guy certainly needs to be knocked off his high horse and spend some time on the ground.

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  9. elmowrites says:

    Good for her; sounds like he knew which buttons to press too … to his fault

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  10. I was reliving a particularly contentious sailing mishap when I read this. Luckily I didn’t hang my man from the halyard afterwards. I wonder why they think we act faster when they yell at us.
    I hope your trip is without conflict. 🙂

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  11. I’m laughing here, Sandra, especially after having spent a short but wonderful time on the boat. My imagination is running riot. Love the title, too.

    janet

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  12. paulmclem says:

    Sounds like something you’ve been tempted to do…or have already done…lol.

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  13. Dave says:

    Can you burn your bridges with water? Guess you can!

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  14. Joy Pixley says:

    Yeah, you should never yell at your partner when she has control of your boat, or you’ll get what you deserve!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. sue says:

    Yes, justice!!

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  16. I didn’t get the sailspeak but I laughed, nevertheless. 🙂 Loved the pun 😀

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  17. ceayr says:

    Very funny and, speaking as one who has crewed on occasion, very realistic.
    Some guys just put on that hat…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sandra says:

      I always despair when I see a man in a captain’s hat on a small boat. It nearly always ends in trouble. The OH knows I will only tolerate a beanie hat in our wheelhouse. 🙂

      Like

  18. Margaret says:

    I can only echo CE above me. I laughed so much reading your story, I’ve done a little bit of sailing, and your story made me remember all the yelling and high drama that goes on even in just a little race around a tiny inland Australian lake. Is CE right? Is it the skipper’s hat? Great story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sandra says:

      Some men are very bossy on the water. I saw one woman being ordered “NOT to let go of that rope, WHATEVER”, and then her husband gunned the boat away from the quayside, she hung on and… well it was the most artistic, arched descent into water that I’ve ever seen. And still she didn’t let go of the rope… Thanks for reading Margaret.

      Like

  19. Dale says:

    My dad had a sailboat. As impatient as he could be, he usually managed to keep the yelling/sarcasm down to a minimum – he did, after all, enjoy when people came sailing with him! To this day, my neighbour knows to call it a line and not a rope (over 25 years ago!)

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  20. Her ‘ship’ has certainly sailed away from him.

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  21. plaridel says:

    great post. this is one example on how to use a metaphor effectively.

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  22. Nan Falkner says:

    Well, think he should have kept his mouth shut – Men are slow learners! Cute story! Nan

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  23. Great cruising stuff there. I bet it’s happened more than once.

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  24. gahlearner says:

    I love it, the perfect revenge. I know the situation, as many others do, and am short of patience and vocal about it, too. But if you cross a line, when sarcasm becomes and end in itself, the respect is lost, the ship has sailed. Perfect story, as always.

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  25. Well, I guess she showed him. That was great, Sandra. I could just see the boat hanging there. Well done. 😀 — Suzanne

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  26. Dee says:

    Although I’m not a boat person in the way that you are, I understood perfectly and am so proud of your heroine. As my grandmother would have said ‘Ship up or ship out’ he definitely shipped out!

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  27. Amy Reese says:

    It serves him right yelling at her like that. You do know your boat terms, Sandra. I’m impressed. I could follow along and marvel at your work. Nice one. Bon voyage. Safe travels to you.

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  28. Great story, as always, and super metaphor.

    Like

  29. asarpota says:

    Was with you most of it, lost a bit, but then picked it up in the end.. Great one 🙂

    Like

  30. erinleary says:

    Love this – it made me feel like I was cruising the waterways along with you. I hope your husband is a little less bossy. I was never a very good first mate. I have a hard time taking orders. 😄

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  31. There must be 50 ways to leave your lover.

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  32. draliman says:

    Ha ha, sounds like he deserved that! It brings a hilarious image to mind 🙂

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  33. So mean of him to address her as a cretin. It’s good she walks away from him.http://ideasolsi65.blogspot.in/2015/09/boat.html?m=1

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  34. Indira says:

    I also love heroins having the last laugh, especially in this case. How well you write dear.

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  35. Good for her. My father owned a yacht and after the first few trips out to sea with him, my mother and I stayed at home relaxing while he did the serious racing with an all-male crew.

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  36. rgayer55 says:

    We went through a series of locks on the upper Mississippi. This is hilarious. The last line really cracked me up. He only died figuratively this time. HA!

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  37. i b arora says:

    an intriguing way to end a relationship

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  38. I’m late, again, to the party, but there are still treats! I knew YOU would have a clever angle for this one. I love imagining you guys on your barge, coasting the waterways… and I love that you can then spin that lovely image in such a wickedly clever way. 😉 Safe travels Sandra!

    Like

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