Someone Else’s Dream – Friday Fictioneers

copyright Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

copyright Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

It occurs to her that since he brought her here, there has never been a day without mist shrouding the boundary fence.

How strange; when he talks about the view – the rolling fields, the distant spires.

Every morning he leaves the house, disappears into the mist and takes the motorway south to the sun, re-emerging revitalised at dusk.

Today she ventures out of the garden. A yard from the fence, right around the house, the ground sheers away into an abyss.

She returns indoors, sits at her laptop.

Slowly, she begins to construct a fragile bridge to the outside world.

On our journey south once again, stopping off in France for a couple of days, whilst looking forward to blue skies and milder weather.  Here on the boat, the marina is like a ghost town, masts shrouded in mist, dripping spiders’ webs festooned from bow to bow like an obstacle course.  Ugh!   Thanks to Rochelle for leading the Friday Fictioneers steadily onwards to the end of the year.

About Sandra

I cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and write fiction and poetry. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers, Just Sayin' and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

69 Responses to Someone Else’s Dream – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Oooh, Sandra. So creepy. Imagine discovering that the land ended beyond the garden. So many great questions stirred up by this – why, how did she get there, and where does he go?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I can really feel the angst of the housewife stranded. It’s a great image.. and the creepiness of discovering the realms is really well done. There is also a hope that she will find her way to change things, she is not the passive woman that is so often portrayed…

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      I had several takes on this, agoraphobia, a controlling partner, a recluse, someone recovering from a mental illness. And I didn’t really decide so it’s up for whatever interpretation people prefer. Thanks for reading.

      Like

  3. I’m wondering if your view of the mist and spider webs gave you the atmosphere for your story. It’s indeed a creepy mystery. Well done as always. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Like

  4. Dear Sandra,

    Atmospheric and shrouded in mystery. I can’t help wondering how she’s going to build her fragile bridge. It seems this could be a longer piece. I certainly want to know more. Well written as always.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      Thanks for reading Rochelle. I was all over the place with this one, my mind brimming with ‘takes’ but none of them coming home to roost. I think it shows. Not to worry. 🙂

      Like

  5. ceayr says:

    Brrr, superbly atmospheric.
    I love the analogy of the bridge she is building.

    Like

  6. Ooooh…this has to have a continuation. Well done dear…

    Like

  7. I guess this is how it feels for a foreigner in a strange new place, like you are cut off from all that is familiar, but also strange.
    I love that she found a way to bring the world to her.
    I can totally relate with this.
    Loved it.

    Like

  8. Bloggeuse says:

    Beautifully poignant.

    Like

  9. Lets hope the bridge holds. I’m not sure whether to read this as reality or as a metaphor, but both ways work for me.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Lonely as well as creepy. Brilliantly done Sandra.

    Like

  11. elmowrites says:

    Such a vivid sad story, Sandra. I’m left wondering (in a good way) how much it is metaphorical, how much psychological, how much real. I’ve felt like your heroine sometimes too. This could be the beginning of an incredible (and incredibly resonant) novel.

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      I had too many ideas floating around in my head ranging from agoraphobia, loneliness and depression, through to more mundane ‘controlling partner’ or ‘virtual prisoner’. I never really reached a conclusion so I thought I’d leave it open. Thanks for reading Jennifer.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. paulmclem says:

    Think I’m with Elmo here, my feeling is that this is a psychological abyss. For some reason she has created her own prison and so needs to find her own way out. Perhaps writing will be her release.

    Like

  13. misskzebra says:

    I was struggling to understand whether the story was completely literal or metaphorical, but either way it makes an interesting piece to read. I like how bizarre a literal interpretation would be.

    Like

  14. Danny James says:

    Hope she builds a strong bridge!

    DJ

    Like

  15. Gave me the shivers, Sandra. I wonder just how many women fell as trapped as she does. Hope she decides to blog about it on WP. 🙂

    Like

  16. I went with the metaphorical interpretation and I like the idea of expanding your world through writing. Isn’t this what we all do? Happy Birthday
    Tracey

    Like

  17. Dale says:

    I love the atmosphere you created, well loved how well you described it, felt for the woman living it. You may have been all over the place in your mind, but we all seem to agree it was great! Leaving the wide opening to our imaginations is a good thing!

    Like

  18. draliman says:

    Poor woman stuck out in the middle of nowhere. Thank Heavens for the internet. I like your use of the word “fragile” in that sentence.

    Like

  19. Jan Brown says:

    I love the feeling of isolation, the frustration, and a search for a way out. Finally, she uses the internet to connect with the world. As someone with a chronic illness and limited mobility, I also use the internet to maintain my relationships and to maintain a feeling of productivity. I’m glad you left this story open to interpretation. It really hit home with me.

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      Hi Jan, I can identify with the frustration you must feel, and am as grateful as you that the internet can help to maintain not only contact but a sense of moving onwards and upwards. I hope the story didn’t make you sad. Thanks for reading.

      Like

  20. mjlstories says:

    I love that this works on different levels. It reminds me a little of how I felt living in America with no job of my own, my husband leaving for work every day – only this was in blazing sunshine not atmospheric mist. Ultimately an optimistic piece.

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      Yes, I’ve found myself stranded in foreign countries whilst my husband went off to find fulfilment in his daily work. There’s only so much sunbathing you can do before you start to feel frustrated though… 🙂 Thanks for reading.

      Like

  21. plaridel says:

    well, i suppose she has internet connection. 🙂

    Like

  22. rgayer55 says:

    Connie probably wishes I’d come home revitalized. She could always join the fictioneers.

    Like

  23. Amy Reese says:

    This has a fantastical feel to it of new worlds not yet discovered, although I know that wasn’t your intention. I bet the husband is up to no good. I think he needs to spend some time with the wife

    Like

  24. ansumani says:

    I got the metaphorical view of the story and the ending is powerful – these online bridges are fragile indeed but for someone stuck without a “revitalizing” day outside, that’s all they can have.

    Good one.

    Like

  25. erinleary says:

    Pooh…creepy and ominous, but beautifully written. Loved it.

    Like

  26. Margaret says:

    He’s revitalised by his daily trips to the sun – that’s intriguing. I hope she writes welll and builds a good strong bridge – to somewhere. I love the open-endedness of your story.

    Like

  27. I get the sense that she is afraid of life and clings to the little reality she knows. It is a self-imposed exile, and I understand it all too well. Hope she learns to free herself.

    Like

  28. I felt like I got to know her in 100 words and yet by your comments you weren’t sure who she was. To me, she was a recluse; and an author.

    Like

  29. Sandra, I say this too often perhaps, but is one of your finest. The metaphors, the imagery, the incredible narrative is incredible. I can imagine this scene so clearly… just sublime!

    Like

  30. I like the paranormal touch you added here.

    Like

  31. I like the contrast between the unnerving isolation and the hopeful ending – you got the balance just right. The land falling away put me in mind of The Truman Show – what lies beyond the edge that she cannot pass?

    Like

  32. She comes over as a wife of a controlling husband who wants her to stay at home and keep house, while he is the sole breadwinner. Maybe she had a good job that she was competent at before she married him, but her present life without challenge or daily company has left a giant void. So the bridge is her way back to the person she once was.
    Whatever you meant by this story, it works excellently because it is left so open to interpretation by your very clever use of words.

    Like

  33. rogershipp says:

    The ‘net’ as the only escape. A very lonely world.

    Like

I'd love to hear your views; it reassures me I'm not talking to myself.

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