La Place de l’Etoile – Friday Fictioneers, May 2017

Confetti and horse-shoes…  champagne and roses… cheers as our horse-drawn carriage pulled out of La Place de l’Etoile.

It seemed we’d live forever, yet in no time at all we were spending more time looking for our glasses than through them…

And we started discussing the inevitable.

You’ll go before me, he said.

I suspected I wouldn’t.

I’ll manage on my own, he said.

But he knew that he couldn’t

His diagnosis rendered both conjectures irrelevant, and tonight, as agreed, I’m preparing a nightcap… hot milk and morphine.

Plenty for each of us.

Who’s to say that we shouldn’t…?

A depressing little tale, but it was this or nothing, given my current time constraints, and besides, it always seems ill-mannered not to participate when it’s one of your photographs that’s providing the prompt.  This was taken in a little French village close to the canal – neither of can remember which one, but at least we both know where our glasses are.  Today at least.  Rochelle leads the Friday Fictioneers into another week – with a truly enlightening theme to her story.  I urge you to read it and follow the link provided.

About Sandra

I cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and write fiction and poetry. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers, Just Sayin'. Bookmark the permalink.

73 Responses to La Place de l’Etoile – Friday Fictioneers, May 2017

  1. neilmacdon says:

    There was a time when what was important, according to Douglas Adams, was knowing where your towel is. He never spoke about glasses

    Like

  2. Dear Sandra,

    A beautifully depressing and touching story. I could relate to spending more time looking for their glasses than looking through them. Once more, you show us how it’s done. Thank you for the lovely photograph as well.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    PS Thank you for the shout out to my story. 😉

    Like

  3. They could book a cruise on one of the smaller Med ships and step off the stern together one night. Hot milk and morphine sounds a lot better than it is. I speak from experience 😉
    Well done, and a lovely photo. I envy the BMW rider parked there. That’s one of my dreams.

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      Can’t stand hot milk, even the smell is enough to make me ill. We used to have a BMW tourer. Used to take me a couple of hours to get my knees back together again when I got off it.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Iain Kelly says:

    A sad but inevitable tale for many couples. Nicely done.

    Like

  5. Well constructed tale, Sandra.

    Like

  6. Lynn Love says:

    For me it’s my glasses and my phone – I just wish I could ring my glasses as easily as I can my phone when I’ve lost them.
    A sweetly sad tale, Sandra and you’re right – who’s to say they shouldn’t slip away together like that. Together at the start of their story, together at the end – feels right

    Like

  7. granonine says:

    Ah, what an evocative ending to what must have been a happy life together.

    Like

  8. James says:

    There was a scene in a limited run TV series call “Containment” where an older couple, trapped in a quarantine area with a deadly virus, chose this end for themselves. I really loved the characters and was a tad miffed that they ended up dying.

    Like

  9. But maybe it’s a great fulfillment of life… BTW it could be a good idea to have many pair of glasses.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sandra says:

      I have two pairs of ‘proper’ glasses, Bjorn, and about eight or nine ‘cheap-o’s’ that I leave about the place. They’re not good enough for a long read, but OK for a quick read of instructions, telephone numbers, texts, etc. 🙂

      Like

  10. JS Brand says:

    In just a few words you’ve pushed buttons at opposite ends of the emotional spectrum. The line about looking for glasses made me smile because my wife and I have been there many times. Reading on left me feeling sad, partly through sympathy with the characters who you drew so well, but also because of the realisation that one day we might be there too. Great writing Sandra.

    Like

  11. This is such a moving story. But it sounds like they had a lovely life and are going to leave together.

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  12. Short but very sweet.

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  13. jellico84 says:

    I just read this to Hubby…now, he’s staring at me with a really weird look on his face… He just came in the door with a gallon of milk…. should I be scared??? Heheee… great write! We both enjoyed it! 🙂 ❤

    Like

  14. The perfect way to go…together.

    Like

  15. Indira says:

    Hi Sandra! What a beautiful way of writing. Unique and touching. I would like the same end for me. Who says we couldn’t go together… in no time at all we were spending more time looking for our glasses than through them …terrific.

    Like

  16. Depressing story but good writing as always, Sandra. I wear my glasses all the time so I don’t have to look for them. Thanks for the lovely picture. I was wondering where it was taken. I should have guessed as you and your husband spend so much time in France. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Like

  17. draliman says:

    From marriage to a shared life to a shared death. A sad tale, well written.

    Like

  18. rgayer55 says:

    At first, I thought the title was Eww, de toilette, as you were obviously going for senior humor. Forgetfulness is only part of the problem. I suspect there will come a time for all of us when the alternative looks preferable to growing older.

    Like

  19. subroto says:

    A sad and bittersweet story. But what if she is forgetful and doesn’t drink her share? I hope she still gets the insurance.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Such a sad story, but I can imagine a couple choosing this course of action, if they couldn’t bear to live without each other. I can think of tastier drinks with which to swallow the morphine, though! As for lost glasses, when I reached the point that I had separate glasses for reading, seeing in the distance, and filtering out the sun, I decided that it was time to replace them with one pair of varifocals with reaction lenses. The final straw was when I accused somebody of picking up my reading glasses and moving them, when I had them perched on my head D:

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      The problem with those multi-purpose specs, Sarah, is that you’re well and truly screwed when you do lose them. I rely on two pairs of ‘proper’ specs, and tons of cheapos dotted all over the house and in different handbags. Couldn’t read a book with the cheapos, but they do for a quick glance at instructions. Is there anyone in this world who can read today’s instruction labels?

      Liked by 1 person

      • One of my eyes is moderately long-sighted and the other moderately short-sighted, which is quite useful. I’m not totally screwed without my glasses, but wouldn’t risk driving my car and probably couldn’t watch foreign films with subtitles on TV. I can just about read most instructions labels with my glasses on, but there are a few that are so tiny they require me to use a magnifying glass, too! Ultimately, I don’t think that lots of close work on the computer has done my eyesight any favours.

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Dale says:

    Such a sweet tale, Sandra. There are worse ways to go… together and peacefully sounds like a plan – for them anyway!

    Like

  22. Very well written, poignant, realistic. As couples we all know that “someday” separation is almost certain.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Very well done. Definitely solves the problem–and heartache–of someone being left behind.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Life Lessons of a Dog Lover says:

    I agree with all the comments, I too loved the line about the glasses. I didn’t find this sad, I like the acceptance of reality and the wisdom and strength to take control of the inevitable.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Pingback: Black Lightning: Fiction Friday | It's a long story …

  26. Dear Sandra,
    Your FF stories always a powerful read. This one is touchingly sad with love all rolled into an account of two people making their own decisions to the end. I have been left with many thoughts from this story. Beautifully done …
    Isadora 😎

    Like

  27. Off into the sunset, together. A very moving tale.

    My FF story, Ma Fantaisie Francais!

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Liz Young says:

    That kind of love when one can’t live without the other is a rare treasure. Thanks for the photo.

    Like

  29. Sarah Ann says:

    That was a whirlwind marriage- so much life in so few words. And only a little depressing – they are still together and facing the future, however short, as one. Great story.

    Like

  30. mjlstories says:

    Sad but with a core of humour and love. Putting reading glasses over my varifocal glasses by mistake is the one that gets to me!

    Like

  31. yuhublogger says:

    Such a sad tale. I loved it. Thanks for the lovely photograph!

    Like

  32. I certainly understand the sentiment of “going” together. Of course some days the togetherness is highly over rated. Ha ha
    Tracey

    Like

  33. plaridel says:

    they have chosen to die with dignity. who are we to judge?

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Very touching and well-written story, The echoing woouldn’t… couldn’t… shouldn’t… was poetic

    Like

  35. I loved the “looking for glasses” part. Made me laugh, because I can relate, and also effortlessly gives a great idea of the couple in their final years. Reminds me of an elderly couple in Georgia Bockoven’s The Beach House, which I’m reading right now.

    Like

  36. My best friends parents died last year within 10 days of each other. No one was surprised.

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      Yes, I’ve heard of that. I had a friend who’s grandparents died within half an hour of each other. One was in hospital, and the other at home, and in good health. So strange.

      Liked by 1 person

  37. restlessjo says:

    It’s a lovely photograph for a sad story, but still.. life can be that way. 🙂

    Like

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