With a Capital T – Friday Fictioneers, November 2017

Copyright J Hardy

 

I still miss Annie, in a way.

I’m told she’s unfriended me on Facebook… but I blocked her months ago.

We’d been friends from the cradle.  She was my rock, my confidante, the person who could make everything right.  I relied on her judgement.

“Too much,” said my mother.

“Fight your own corners,” urged my father.

After a string of failed friendships, unhappy love affairs, lost jobs and a broken engagement, finally the smoke began to clear.

It had seemed that Annie’s strength lay in putting out fires.

But then I understood she was in the business of starting them.


I dislike November – just sayin’.  Still, one bright spot in the week is Friday Fictioneers, under the illustrious leadership of Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  Onwards and upwards to the end of the year… 😦

About Sandra

I cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and write fiction and poetry. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

70 Responses to With a Capital T – Friday Fictioneers, November 2017

  1. MrBinks says:

    Very good. I loved the opening “in a way.” It sets the scene perfectly in 3 words.

    Like

  2. Reena Saxena says:

    I like the ending. It has a metaphorical edge.

    Like

  3. This sounds like a page from my youth, I remember that kind of a “friendship”. Nicely done.

    Like

  4. Iain Kelly says:

    Lucky to get away unscathed.

    Like

  5. Oh a secret betrayer…

    Like

  6. I loved the layers and metaphors in this. It is not uncommon to have the fire lit by the fireman and the same with her friend.

    Like

  7. Danny James says:

    Full employment.

    DJ

    Liked by 1 person

  8. michael1148humphris says:

    Sounds toxic, yet a few people thrive on toxic, I am wondering if Annie will be refriended

    Like

  9. One minute you’re having tea and the next she’s burning down the neighborhood! I like the allegory. Well told.

    Like

  10. Dear Sandra,

    Great metaphor. I’ve had a few Annie’s in my life. In fact I worked with one who had such a knack for stirring up the feces I quipped the day she was terminated, “Never has on person made so many so happy just by leaving.”
    I love the dry delivery of you story. Annie is a good kind of person to ‘miss.’ Wonderfully written.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

  11. neilmacdon says:

    Oh you know Annie too? She’s beautifully rendered here

    Like

  12. yarnspinnerr says:

    Wow. You always succeed to say so much in these hundred words. Loved the last line.

    Like

  13. granonine says:

    Oho! A wonderful metaphor, that friend who seemed to specialize in putting out fires. Nice one.

    Like

  14. Ooh, that Annie’s a bad ‘un! With friends like that…

    Like

  15. Annie must not have had a life of her own. Or was constantly playing, “Let’s you and him fight.” Good thing your character finally did see the light.
    Good story and well done. The only blip I saw was the “But then” in the last line, noticed because I’m editing my own writing now and my three most overused words are: and, but, then. Sigh! They sneak in everywhere.

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      You think it would read better and still make sense without them? Personally, I try to avoid the use of the words ‘suddenly’ and ‘eventually’ which might amount to the same thing, and there weren’t enough words to permit ‘in the fullness of time’. Each to his own, I guess. Thanks for reading.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You[‘re right. Adverbs are anathema, too, these days.
        One famous writer & teacher (NYTimes Best-Selling etc.) who I’ve been following says we should never use “Then”. I can see it’s overused and in writing my “Nano” story I’m trying to watch it, but it does come in so handy — as opposed to constant short sentences, like:
        “She took the flaming pot of oil off the stove. She dialed 911. She grabbed the fire extinguisher.”

        Like

        • Sandra says:

          Personally, I don’t get too hung up on ‘vogue’ concepts about writing. I use whatever words balance the piece to my own eyes and ears. And I’d never link those sentences with ‘then’ anyway, but rather ‘Having taken the flaming pot of oil from the stove, she dialled 999 before grabbing the fire extinguisher.’ I’m also a great advocate for the use of a gerund where possible.

          Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m certain this is true of many a friendship even if we haven’ realised it yet.

    Click to read my FFfAW!

    Like

  17. James says:

    Great interpretation of the prompt and excellent personal interplay between your protagonist and Annie. Once she got her life in order, Annie no longer fit.

    Like

  18. Very well crafted story – I enjoyed it!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Like

  19. pennygadd51 says:

    I love the way the prompt inspired such a good metaphor, that you used so effectively. A fire raiser masquerading as a firefighter, hidden by a smokescreen – nice work!

    Like

  20. Lynn Love says:

    Oh, my word! This seems ot be based on a woman I used to know – we were very good friends until I realised what a ‘firestarter’ she was. Wonderfully done, Sandra – you managed to convery so much in so few words. Terrific

    Like

  21. Dale says:

    Way too many “Annies” in this world. I think we all know at least one…

    Like

  22. Wonderful story, I knew an Annie once.

    Like

  23. M K Zebra says:

    A creative use of a the prompt Sandra, and a very relatable story to a lot of people!

    Like

  24. JS Brand says:

    A really good way to take the prompt Sandra and skilfully written. People like Annie show the flaw in the expression “A friend in need is a friend in deed”. A friend who creates the need is really an enemy, much like friends who only turn up when they need something.
    Bitter? Me?

    Like

  25. Varad says:

    This was a fantastic read, Sandra. There are some people who ingratiate themselves into the lives of others and then try to keep themselves relevant using all possible ways. Your Annie was exactly that.

    Like

  26. draliman says:

    Sounds like it took a while to discover the “real” Annie. Nice one!

    Like

  27. Liz Young says:

    An arsonist wouldn’t be my shoice of friend either, but if Annie had unfriended me I’d be worried!

    Like

  28. Well, she is fire starter and fireman. I think I know her. I have had to unfriend the unfriendly at times.

    Like

  29. Moon says:

    I guess i have been really lucky. I would have hated to have been betrayed thus.
    Brilliant writing and i really love the title.

    Like

  30. Laurie Bell says:

    Oh no… awful friend…
    Best unfriended.
    Great story Sandra

    Like

  31. rgayer55 says:

    This one works to a T. We can all relate. Annie’s abound.

    Like

  32. Nan Falkner says:

    Jeepers, I remember people like Annie and they do cause havoc in the calm waters of life. Great story – easy to relate to. Thanks!

    Like

  33. Balaka says:

    A friend like Annie who needs an enemy..loved the twist at the end.

    Like

  34. rachelmalik99 says:

    I really like this metaphorical take on the picture. And a very good way of creating a character without the reader realising it. There are way too many Annies about alas.

    Like

  35. It seems there are a lit of people like Annie. Sadly it takes a while to smoke them out.

    Like

  36. Like this a lot… almost like Münchausen by proxy…

    Like

  37. Excellent writing, as usual, Sandra. What a shame when we think we know a person and actually don’t, having to give up what we considered a true friendship. —- Suzanne

    Like

  38. Dahlia says:

    A very telling tale! I really liked this one a lot

    Like

  39. magarisa says:

    The last line tied up the story perfectly!

    Like

  40. Sarah Ann says:

    I hope Anne was left behind early enough to give your narrator time to find a good job, have a wonderful love affair, and make some decent friends. So well told.

    Like

  41. Indira says:

    Simply wonderful.

    Like

I'd love to hear your views; it reassures me I'm not talking to myself.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.