Through A Glass Darkly – Friday Fictioneers, January 2019

I thought I knew him but, in retrospect, I’m not sure what I thought I knew.

We’d slotted comfortably together like a jigsaw, albeit with some pieces now slightly worn at the edges – no longer the perfect fit, perhaps.  Sufficient though for the world to see the whole picture… more or less.

Of course, now that the tabloids, Twitterati and keyboard warriors have had their day, it’s clear the image on the lid didn’t even begin to resemble the contents.

And whoever it was I’d known… well, he slipped out the door years ago, shattering it as he left.

The days are getting infinitesimally longer, yay!  Bought my first daffodils yesterday, and though the Beast from the East is being threatened on an almost daily basis, the bluebells, crocus and tulips in my garden are throwing caution to the winds!  Thanks once again to Rochelle for leading the Friday Fictioneers out towards the longer days. 

About Sandra

I used to cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and wrote fiction and poetry. Now I live on the beautiful Dorset coast, enjoying the luxury of being able to have a cat, cultivating an extensive garden and getting involved in the community. I still write fiction, but only when the spirit moves me - which isn't as often as before. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
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78 Responses to Through A Glass Darkly – Friday Fictioneers, January 2019

  1. ceayr says:

    I love – and recognise – ‘slightly worn at the edges’.
    As deftly created as ever.
    I read, and try to learn.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. neilmacdon says:

    I love this, Sandra. It’s so clever, with so many threads leading outwards

    Like

  3. Anita says:

    He left leaving a shattered door and sad heart behind…
    I am sure she still misses him.

    Like

  4. Dear Sandra,

    This one stings. Twitterati? I love that. So many of them these days are getting caught with their pants down, aren’t they? So well done. Your muse is at the top of her game today.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Pingback: Claire Fuller | TALES FROM THE MOTHERLAND

  6. Great ending on this. I was thinking about Marcia Brady never again washing the hand that Davy Jones shook and wondering if the narrator left the smashed door as a memento mori.

    Like

  7. Beautifully done, Sandra.

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Like

  8. Dale says:

    This was so well crafted, Sandra. I am in awe of your ability to create such fabulous stories out of broken pieces.

    Like

  9. This was beautifully crafted, as the others too have mentioned. I am a huge fan of writing, especially your ability to weave subtleties where one thought none existed. Simply outstanding, Sandra.

    Like

  10. Rowena says:

    Sandra, I really loved this reflective piece and there are so many great phrases throughout. My favourites were : “We’d slotted comfortably together like a jigsaw, albeit with some pieces now slightly worn at the edges” and the last line.
    I have been having some similar reflections in a post I wrote today about visiting the village of Bangalow, just inland from Byron Bay in Northern NSW. I’ve been going there at least once a year for almost 20 years and yet I saw it in a new light this time and picked up on more of its historical details, probably due to my blog writing. I questioned that sense of place and how well we know even where we live: https://beyondtheflow.wordpress.com/2019/01/16/byron-bay-continued-walking-through-bangalows-past/
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Like

  11. StuHN says:

    Really excellent in depicting the duplicity of others, and the effects of finally discovering the non-attractive side of it.

    Like

  12. granonine says:

    Twitterati and keyboard warriors. Wonderful. In real English, a “twit” is a silly person, having to common sense and being worth very little. I think it applies.

    Like

  13. Liz Young says:

    Clever analogy, Sandra, and a neat representation of what happens in many relationships. Worn at the edges – no longer fit. Yes.

    Like

  14. I’m loving the different takes on this photo – kudos!

    Like

  15. jwdwrites says:

    For me jigsaw season is Christmas, but I have never seen an online one. Did she (or he) modify her opinion of him because of what she read? The sources she referred to seem dubious to say the least. I hope they were not the cause of her relationship schism, but either way another quality offering from you Sandra. I hope you are enjoying this thoroughly pleasant Dorset Winter as much as I am.here in Christchurch. 🙂

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      I’m totally hooked now, I’m afraid. Whenever someone else is ‘outed’ for serial misconduct, I always think of the poor wife/partner who has to deal not only with the fact of the misconduct, but the surrounding publicity. And I’m loving winter in Dorset, though being so close to the coast I’m not getting the wintry photo shoots I’m used to. Still, I’ll live with that! 🙂

      Like

  16. It’s good he’s out of her life. Hopefully, her shattered pieces will mend. A beautifully written poignant story, as always!

    Like

  17. Iain Kelly says:

    The jigsaw symbolism is expertly drawn. Well done as always Sandra.

    Like

  18. michael1148humphris says:

    Great imagery Sandra, I am jealous.

    Like

  19. You bring the imagery off the page so well in this. Perfectly crafted.

    Like

  20. So much to love here, as always. Love Twitterati! Excellent!

    Like

  21. Varad says:

    Another brilliant one, Sandra. Very clever and original. Loved it.

    Like

  22. You told us so much in just a few well-crafted sentencces – another lesson in word economy!

    Like

  23. Violet Lentz says:

    Leaving shards of many kinds.

    Like

  24. draliman says:

    Very nice take on the shattered door. I’m going to have to remember the “image on the lid” quote. And I loved “Twitterati” 🙂

    Like

  25. gahlearner says:

    Keyboard warriers is what cracked me up. The story sounds oddly familiar with all the revelations about people we thought we knew. Wonderful writing, as always.

    Like

  26. plaridel says:

    relationships aren’t immune to wear and tear like a car. without regular maintenance, they stop working right if at all.

    Like

  27. Jelli says:

    Love the flavor of this spicy little tale.

    Like

  28. Nice take and very well done. Yes, sometimes things are worn around the edges … sometimes there’s more that is hidden and remains unseen … (and shatters as it leaves) … Well done!

    Like

  29. 4963andypop says:

    What a regretful look in the rearview mirror. Like the plays a glass and mirrors. Hope she does not remain shattered.

    Like

  30. So obscure and yet I can somehow relate.

    Like

  31. Piyali says:

    There’s nothing I can add to the beautiful comments that already have been posted in response to an extremely well-crafted story. I am honing my writing and I am grateful to be able to interact with talented writers such as yourself. There’s a great deal for me to learn from wordsmiths like you.

    Like

  32. The violence of the door shattering shows is other side and confirms she’s best off without him. People are so adept at hiding certain traits but their guard always drops over time

    Like

  33. Kalpana Solsi says:

    Slightly worn at the edges……. I remember playing the jigsaw puzzles with my kid years ago .
    He left shattering the glass door and the door to her heart. Seems she hasn’t yet replaced the splintered pane.

    https://ideasolsi65.blogspot.com/2019/01/door.html

    Like

  34. That’s what happens to most relationships after a certain no of years.. It frays and slips through our fingers.. Good description Sandra

    Like

  35. i b arora says:

    the undercurrents always leave a pain

    Like

  36. James McEwan says:

    And he won’t be back to fix it.I like how you compare relationships with jigsaw pieces.

    Like

  37. Margaret says:

    Good one. I particularly like the ending – ‘whoever it was i’d known’ – chilling.

    Like

  38. magarisa says:

    A well-crafted, poignant tale. The metaphor of the jigsaw puzzle is very effective.

    Like

  39. Alas this happens way to often…. love the title and I could see Bergman there in your tale.

    Like

  40. Masterful storytelling, Sandra! Do we ever really know someone? Beautifully reflective piece on how we keep up the outward pretence, when in reality it no longer exists.

    Like

  41. Damn those tabloid. I wonder what the picture on the packaging would be for me?

    Like

  42. Lynn Love says:

    Loving the metaphors of a shattered life, of a destroyed relationships, with hardly anything left to recognise. Nicely done, Sandra

    Like

  43. Lynn Love says:

    P.S I genuinely wrote my story and picked the title before reading yours – we were both inspired by that same phrase. Sorry!

    Like

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