Field Trip – Friday Fictioneers, August 2019

Copyright Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

 

There are a hundred and one reasons why his daughter constantly kicks over the traces.

And the woman sitting opposite him, fussily arranging and re-arranging the table setting, well… she’s probably the biggest one.

One thrives on order, the other on chaos, and together they’ve brought this fragile nucleus to the point of collapse.

Drained by drama, consumed by conflict, and wearied by warring, he’s calling it a day.

There’s a furrow out there with his name on it; he’s off to plough it.

“Call me when the battle’s over.”

He may or may not be inclined to pick up.

 

I might be missing in action myself for a couple of weeks as the annual advent of the grandkids looms.  Two teens and a seven year old… the possibilities are endless.  😉  I’ll look in on Friday Fictioneers when I can, and thanks to Rochelle as ever.

About Sandra

I used to cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and wrote fiction and poetry. Now I live on the beautiful Dorset coast, enjoying the luxury of being able to have a cat, cultivating an extensive garden and getting involved in the community. I still write fiction, but only when the spirit moves me - which isn't as often as before. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers, Just Sayin'. Bookmark the permalink.

71 Responses to Field Trip – Friday Fictioneers, August 2019

  1. neilmacdon says:

    Elegant, clever, and evocative as always, Sandra

    Like

  2. Tannille says:

    Yep, sometimes calling it a day and leaving others to it is the best solution.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Iain Kelly says:

    My advice, best to stay well out the way and leave them to it! Enjoy the grandkids celebrations!

    Like

  4. Dear Sandra,

    First I had to look up “kicks over the traces.” Not one of those phrases you often hear here. So my brain has wrinkled with another piece of knowledge. 😉 And I can see why she would. Mixed signals and ensuing chaos between her parents would do it. Well done as always.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  5. Anita says:

    Tensions and fights in the family are always a point of concern.
    It’s a great idea to return when they are done!
    Hope he’ll get to return soon!

    Like

  6. Brilliant take on the photo prompt – loved it, Sandra!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Like

  7. Dale says:

    Some families seem to thrive on chaos, constantly creating it. I know I would grow weary of it and look for a furrow to plough!
    Well done, Madam!

    Like

  8. I’ve missed your lovely, although not always enjoyable or happy, stories, Sandra. Another good one per usual.

    janet

    Like

  9. Excellent vignette. I love the atmosphere

    Like

  10. granonine says:

    Perfect. In my work as a counselor, I meet a lot of couples whose names are Order and Chaos. The trick is in helping them to tolerate and learn from each other.
    And now I have to go talk to my Chaos about the mess on my dining room table 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Sandra says:

      I know what you mean. I live in a house where the last drawer, cupboard, packet, box to be opened remains open, where the location of any item depends on the last place it was needed, and …. need I continue?

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rowena says:

      That’s interesting, Linda. Opposites seem to attract but it can be a struggle to co-exist if you don’t understand how the dynamic works.I personally don’t believe it’s good to have someone agree with us all the time and not challenge our opinions. Let us do what we want. Times we need someone to say “enough is enough”. For me, Michael Jackson is a good example of what can happen when you surround yourself with yes people. You can become a caricature of yourself or worse. Not healthy. I’m quite extroverted and my husband is an introvert but we understand our different needs. Well, that is most of the time.
      BTW your work must be very interesting and also challenging.
      Best wishes,
      Rowena

      Liked by 1 person

  11. ceayr says:

    Another masterclass in how to create a world in 100 words.
    I think most of us can identify with at least one of these chatacters.

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      I think we all assume these characteristics in the span of a lifetime too. I’m in the husband/father’s face now, but I distinctly remember the other two. Thanks for reading.

      Like

  12. I love how you come up with such wonderful evocative pieces from the prompts. I certainly don’t see what you see, until I read your stories. Brilliantly done. Hope you have a lovely time with your grandkids!

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      Thanks for your comment Brenda. If I don’t get the inspiration within a few minutes of seeing the photo, it’s unlikely I’ll get it at all. 🙂 I’m gearing myself up for next week, but the prospect of serving up three different choices at every meal… 😦

      Liked by 2 people

      • Rowena says:

        I’ll be thinking of you with the meal preparation, Sandra,. It can be a nightmare in our place but we’re getting to a point where we have meals which can be adapted to individual preferences. Good luck!

        Like

  13. Elegantly written, Sandra!
    Boundaries are a good thing … glad he’d drawn them …
    😉
    Enjoy the Grandkids!!!
    Na’ama

    Liked by 1 person

  14. What a mixed up lot they are – I bet life’s never dull!

    Like

  15. Nobbinmaug says:

    You’ve concocted a beautifully poignant tale, as always. As an organization freak, I can relate. They say, “Opposites attract.” I seem to always live with messy people.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sandra says:

      I’m pretty organised too. And it becomes more important as you get older. My husband’s motto – ‘it’s wherever I last used it’ doesn’t work when you can’t remember when or where you last used it. 🙂 Thanks for reading.

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Oh… yes there are sometimes when you have to leave it to others to clear up the mess.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. msjadeli says:

    Caught in the crossfire. I like that last line, as he is taking back some control of himself. Have a good time with your grandkids!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Let them eat cake…and whatever else they want, as long as they leave him alone!

    Like

  19. I was sad reading this, sad things don’t seem to be working out, I guess it’ll sort itself out somehow.

    Like

  20. Abhijit Ray says:

    Sometimes continuous conflict becomes difficult to manage. May be it is better to let parties sort the problem out and arrive at a balance.

    Like

  21. Liz Young says:

    Two teens and a sevenyearold? Hope you survive.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. draliman says:

    Sounds like he’s had enough. I liked the alliteration!

    Like

  23. plaridel says:

    good action on his part. it was good for him not to take sides. 🙂

    Like

  24. People! They can wear you out!

    Like

  25. 4963andypop says:

    A nuclear family, indeed. Perhaps he’s an electron, or an ion always threatening to bounce away. But now i am getting well out of my league. This did have a physics or chemistry feel to it, order and entropy. You gotta feel for the guy!

    Like

  26. James McEwan says:

    Sometimes it is better to just walk away from bickering or else you become the piggy in the middle and are blamed for everything.

    Like

  27. Yikes, not a family w would want to be around for long periods of time either. Nicely done.

    Like

  28. Nan Falkner says:

    Chaos is always present and in reality, I like some of it! It keeps me on my toes. Some people can’t handle it. To each their own but this is the things of life!

    Like

  29. Rowena says:

    Sandra, this was well written as usual. However, what I really liked about it was the conversation it’s generated in the comments and how you created this scenario and characters in so few words which so many of your readers feel passionate about. It’s been very interesting. I think it’s a real pity that so many people don’t understand why opposites come together in a relationship and the importance of that dynamic as a source of growth, balance and perspective. We need to be challenged. However, we also need to be respected, understood and feel wanted. Very interesting.
    Hope you have a great time with your grandchildren and they stay off their devices.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Like

  30. michael1148humphris says:

    I like how use used the prompt to deal with family rows, a great subject. You have given me food for thought.

    Like

  31. A good story with great description, Sandra. What he’s thinking of doing could lead to worse problems. Their daughter is disturbed but what is dad doing to help her? It sounds like she may be screaming inside for attention. —- Suzanne

    Like

  32. lisarey1990 says:

    Great atmosphere. Enjoy the celebrations with the grandkids. 🙂

    Like

  33. Lynn Love says:

    You capture the conflict between family members so well. How different people can be within the same family – just fantastic, Sandra. Have a brilliant couple of weeks with the grandchildren

    Like

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