Just Like Eddie – Friday Fictioneers, May 2020

Copyright C E Ayr

Leather bomber jacket and cowboy boots was a good look back then.  Not so much now though.

He signs his prescription with a flourish.

“People paid good money for that signature,” he says.

The pharmacist smiles weakly; every month the same.

Outside Janis hobbles alongside, tight pedal-pushers and towering grey bouffant, as they follow the music towards the park where they’ll tut, shake their heads and roll their eyes.

Maybe he’ll play a little air-guitar, a riff or two from way back… show them how it’s done.

Or maybe they’ll just go home and wait for Eddie to call them.

 

Not sure we’ve got either the age or geographic demographic amongst the Friday Fictioneers to get this one, and the nostalgia outweighs the musical content, I guess. But it is what it is – and Eddie is the late great Eddie Cochran.  Thanks to Rochelle for all her work.

About Sandra

I used to cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and wrote fiction and poetry. Now I live on the beautiful Dorset coast, enjoying the luxury of being able to have a cat, cultivating an extensive garden and getting involved in the community. I still write fiction, but only when the spirit moves me - which isn't as often as before. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers, Just Sayin'. Bookmark the permalink.

65 Responses to Just Like Eddie – Friday Fictioneers, May 2020

  1. neilmacdon says:

    I loved the picture of Janis (and the name, of course)

    Like

  2. Tannille says:

    I particularly liked the air-guitar reference.

    Like

  3. Anita says:

    It’s always sad when old times and respectability don’t last.
    Times change. People become older. But, memories remain…

    Like

  4. ceayr says:

    I have a friend, Eddie, back in Scotland who does pub entertainment under the title Just Like Eddie.
    Nostalgia, it seems, is a thriving industry.
    And good story with, as always, a sprinkling of sharp-sighted gems.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. pendantry says:

    Good post! Just a bit puzzled why you didn’t include the video itself inline rather than as just a link to it — these youngsters need to be edumacated!

    Like

  6. Iain Kelly says:

    I liked the image of the ageing rock star. They’ll always have the music.

    Like

  7. Dear Sandra,

    “People paid good money for that signature.” So much story in that one line. Poignant and touching as I look back on more years than I have ahead. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sandra says:

      I know what you mean. I never noticed turning the half-way point either. Not that I ever knew exactly where the half way point was, but I had an expectation.

      Like

  8. Reena Saxena says:

    Eddie induces a mysterious note here. Why does he not call them?

    Like

  9. Love this, not least because I have friends who were in the music business yonks ago who have never really been able to let it go. Rock on! I say. 🙂

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Like

  10. I don’t know the names but I got the picture. Sad!

    Like

  11. Eddie was the rocker. His hair shouted “C’mon, everybody!” Great story.

    Like

  12. wmqcolby says:

    I’m with the Queen on this one — that line of “people paid good money for that signature” is priceless. I’m listening to the song you posted while I write this. I’m not familiar with the song, but I CERTAINLY DO know of Eddie Cochrane. Big influence on the British groups. I enjoyed his music.
    Five out of five Hofner basses (mainly because I know Paul McCartney was a big fan of his). You actually helped start my day and it’s only 8:50 am here. 😀

    Like

  13. Liz Young says:

    I could just see them enjoying the music whilte pretending to disapprove. Prescription had me wondering – methadone?

    Like

  14. pennygadd51 says:

    Lovely descriptions, especially of Janis. You convey a type of authenticity about the life chosen by this couple.

    Like

  15. Nobbinmaug says:

    What’s worse, to have it all and watch it fade away or never have it at all? Probably the former, but it has to be hard to see it go.

    Like

  16. Dale says:

    This was great, Sandra. How awful it must be for these ageing rock stars – especially those who are still stuck in the “back then” in dress and manner. Wonderfully done.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sandra says:

      I was in a restaurant recently when I saw a man in his seventies, all in black, boots, jeans, wild grey hair in his ponytail. He sashayed down between the tables towards the toilets and then went in the Ladies. 🙂 Kind of spoilt the moment a tad. Thanks for reading, Dale.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Absolutely brilliant and right up my alley! Thank you!!!

    Like

  18. granonine says:

    I clicked on the link and closed my eyes, letting time take me back to a time when “rock ‘n’ roll” my parents despised was oh, so innocent compared to today’s version. Thanks for the trip, Sandra 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sandra says:

      Yes I remember being in tears when I was watching Cliff Richard (the UK’s Elvis) singing at the London Palladium and my Dad making sarcastic comments about him. Probably a lot like me today on the rare occasion I catch a live act. 🙂 Thanks for reading, Linda.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. notestowomen says:

    Very sad commentary of musicians who are still stuck in the past.

    Like

  20. Mike says:

    Moving with the times, is not for Janis it seems. Your story took me back in time

    Like

  21. The pharmacist smiles weakly; every month the same. I can feel his pain. When I worked at a dental office for more years than I should have, certain patients would come in with the same lines, every, every time. Me: smile and say, “Please have a seat.” You took many of us back in time. Thank you.

    Like

  22. plaridel says:

    sometimes it’s good for a rocker to die young. he’ll never grow old.

    Like

  23. draliman says:

    “Leather bomber jacket and cowboy boots” never goes out of style 🙂 When I read “Eddie” I first assumed you were talking about “Eddie the Head” (Iron Maiden’s mascot), but hey, still music related!
    Quite a sad tale of a rocker remembering his long-gone heyday.

    Like

  24. James McEwan says:

    There is something about music that defines who we are.

    Like

  25. It must be hard to be so admired and then to become forgotten. But it comes with the territory. Hope he has enough memories to get him through.

    Like

  26. Sometimes letting go or moving on is hard to do. …

    Like

  27. This made me smile.

    Like

  28. Eddie Cochran is not, strangely because I say that I love all music, someone I know. I did look at Janis and think Joplin, but maybe that’s not what you intended. However, I loved the piece. I loved the interaction with the pharmacist who goes through this monthly. Great character study!

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      I couldn’t think of a late fifties/early sixties name and when I googled it the names all sounded very staid. And then I realised a very young Janis Joplin was around at that time… 🙂 Thanks for reading.

      Like

  29. This was great, Sandra. I particularly liked the idea of them tutting at the quality of what was before them and their wish to show ’em how it’s done.

    Like

  30. Natasha says:

    Brilliant one, Sandra.
    I like the build up. This one’s wonderfully told.
    “People paid good money for that signature.”
    Ah! yes. That’s the deal-maker. 🙂

    https://natashamusing.com/2020/05/a-star-is-born-fridayfictioneers-fridayfotofiction/

    Like

  31. I like the way you conjure up the faded glory of this couple – her towering grey bouffant, his pharmacist’s weak smile. A mixture of pathos and pretension. Well done.

    Like

  32. MrBinks says:

    “Every month the same” says so much with so little. Great stuff.

    Like

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