A Place for Everything – Friday Fictioneers, January 2021

Copyright Jan Wayne Fields

 

There’s an air of orderliness about him that I wouldn’t have expected.

But when she brings in the tea, pale amber liquid, baby-pink wafers, china cups with impossibly diminutive handles, I understand more clearly.

She sits, primly smoothing her skirt, watching us, bird-like.

When the phone rings she leaves us.

“You’ve changed,” I say.  “I’d never have imagined…”

“No you’ve changed,” he interrupts haughtily, “there was a time when nothing was beyond your imagination.”

The barbs still fly.  Old wounds still fester.

There’s something reassuring about vintage hostilities though; they can keep you warm in a world gone cold with indifference.

A belated Happy New Year to all Friday Fictioneers.    Thanks to Rochelle for leading us into what we hope is a better one for all of us, wherever we are.

About Sandra

I used to cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and wrote fiction and poetry. Now I live on the beautiful Dorset coast, enjoying the luxury of being able to have a cat, cultivating an extensive garden and getting involved in the community. I still write fiction, but only when the spirit moves me - which isn't as often as before. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers, Just Sayin', Published Work and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

59 Responses to A Place for Everything – Friday Fictioneers, January 2021

  1. neilmacdon says:

    I love it. Especially the perceptiveness of the last line. How interesting that we both saw a domestic in that image

    Like

  2. Iain Kelly says:

    A friendship like a comfortable old blanket. Happy New Year Sandra, hope you stay safe and well.

    Like

  3. Dear Sandra,

    Some habits might not be pleasant, but they’re comfortable like an old pair of shoes. I think I related to this one all too well. 😉 Good job.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  4. trishsplace says:

    Insightful, as usual. Well done.

    Like

  5. Tannille says:

    Enjoyed the last line. Wise words.

    Like

  6. ceayr says:

    Sometimes I hope we never meet, because you see right into the soul.
    I read it that he’s still bitter about being rejected.
    As we say here, impec!

    Like

  7. Dale says:

    This was one of those that I read more than once. Just because it is that good. You’ve such a knack for subtlety. Wonderfully done!

    Like

  8. granonine says:

    I share the computer desk with my ADD husband. I’ve had to accept that it will never, ever, be orderly by my own standards. There are just too many squirrels in there!

    Like

  9. bearmkwa says:

    Feeling in an indifferent atmosphere… good take on this. When I saw the pale pinks and china, I almost envisioned a hoighty-toity business man sitting down to a tea party with a wee child.

    Like

  10. Michael says:

    I enjoyed how you used the prompt. I fear the repeated strains of lockdown will test many.

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  11. Sometimes it’s so hard not to get in just one more barb. We hug our bitterness to us. Are we so afraid of the void of indifference? Very well done, very thought-provoking.

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  12. msjadeli says:

    I’ll take the indifference any day!

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  13. elmowrites says:

    Ooh, I loved guessing at the relatonship between these two, and what brought them back together. So many possibilities, but the sharpness says to me it’s an ex-wife meeting her replacement for the first time. Anyway, it’s beautifully written, Sandra. I have missed reading your characters.

    Like

  14. A perfect relationship can too easily become stale and lose its spark. Vive la difference!

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  15. pennygadd51 says:

    Elegant. Full of insight. You give it great impact by your exquisite and so-appropriate descriptions. Lovely!

    Like

  16. oneta hayes says:

    I believe he like things he can control.

    Like

  17. James McEwan says:

    Like a fencing match with words. An unresolved issue percolates the tension.

    Like

  18. Dora says:

    Sandra, It’s easy to see the narrator of this little domestic aperçu was never as easily controlled as the new mistress. The source of the tension, perhaps? You’ve rendered the scene with cinematic force. Truly enjoyable!

    Like

  19. rogershipp says:

    ‘vintage hostilities’ I love that turn-of-word phrase!! Enjoyed.

    Like

  20. I enjoyed reading this tale, Sandra. The last line unveils a great deal.
    Like, Roger(above) “vintage hostilities” are stellar words saying so much.
    Happy New Year 2021 …. Be Safe 😷
    Isadora 😎

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  21. You are the master of details. I clearly imagined the scene and the underlying “vintage hostilities.” Excellent story, Sandra! Belated Happy New Year to you as well!

    Like

  22. draliman says:

    Something familiar to cling to, even if not the friendliest of relationships.

    Like

  23. This was thought-provoking. Do we want to deal with people’s bitterness or their indifference? Is this all it comes down to? Hope not! Yet, sometimes the familiar can seem comforting even if it is hostile and toxic. You do this flash fiction thing so well.

    Like

  24. liz young says:

    I imagine they used to be married. Great observation, as always.

    Like

  25. plaridel says:

    my hat goes off to them. it looks like they’d been together for so long and still endure each other’s idiosyncrasy.

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  26. Love that. Especially the words “vintage hostilities.” Perhaps a good substitute for indifference as you mention.

    Like

  27. I love this little cameo, Sandra. You tell us so much in just enough words. 👏🏻

    Like

  28. goroyboy says:

    Well orchestrated Sandra. I could sense the almost teasing hostilities beyond the façade of new appearances.

    Like

I'd love to hear your views; it reassures me I'm not talking to myself.

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