The Book of Secrets – Friday Fictioneers, December 2016

Copyright Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Copyright Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

 

We mocked her filigree curtains.

“They’re sooo passé, Aunt Josephine.”

She smiled; said they afforded privacy, and we’d understand when we were older.

We laughed, wondering what a woman of 82 would do that required privacy.

After she died, we sorted through her possessions and found a hand-written, leather bound journal, together with her accounts books.

And we understood, reading it, that the lace curtains were not to prevent people looking in; they were to prevent them noticing her looking out.

She left us the house.

And a livelihood.

If you don’t immediately understand this, remember that in short fiction the title often forms part of the story.  🙂  Congratulations to Rochelle, the illustrious leader of Friday Fictioneers, whose third book in her trilogy has been released this week.  Looking forward to reading it. 

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About Sandra

I cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and write fiction and poetry. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
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75 Responses to The Book of Secrets – Friday Fictioneers, December 2016

  1. neilmacdon says:

    How interesting that you focussed on the curtains too!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Dear Sandra,

    I’m fond of those curtains myself. 😉 And the view from my writer’s garret. I’d love to know what’s in that book of secrets…or would I? Well written as always.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  3. ceayr says:

    As cleverly conceived and constructed as always, Sandra, fascinating little tale with delicious twist.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. I was hooked at the title all the way through to a great ending. There are a few Aunt Josephine’s in every neighbourhood, they’re just not usually as enterprising!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Wonderfully subtle as always, Sandra.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I love that you took a small detail and did something fresh with it. You painted a great picture here. Nice work.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Oh, now I have to wonder what Aunt Josephine was all about. May I please open that journal? Well done, as always, Sandra.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Ooooo…blackmail business handed down. Nice!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Iain Kelly says:

    What secrets she must have seen. Lovely writing Sandra, as always.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Liz Young says:

    Oh dear, oh dear! So all those poor beleagured neighbours who danced at her funeral will wake up to a new nightmare.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Sue says:

    Ooooh..nice one, Sandra! Rather a lot of uncomfortable people ….

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I really love the hints you drops… I can actually see her sitting there finding stories… I wonder if she had binoculars too.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. jellico84 says:

    Love it! The same holds true for window blinds. heheheee! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  14. michael1148humphris says:

    What an interesting and naughty lady,

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Fabulous. I like Aunt Josephine.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. plaridel says:

    i never expected where it would lead. very nice.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. wmqcolby says:

    I wonder what was in that book. Probably some accounting of the bank notes, I’m sure, or a novel, maybe of best-seller status, etc. I hate to think she was running a brothel, but, one near knows.

    You delivered the goods, Sandra, with taste and excellence.

    Five out of five glad-to-see-you-agains. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  18. rgayer55 says:

    We had a neighbor named Flossie who was somewhat like Josephine. That journal would make a good movie script.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. yarnspinnerr says:

    I shall be reminded of this whenever I see filigree curtains. Loved this one.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. draliman says:

    Less high-tech than all this webcam blackmailing I keep hearing about, but no less lucrative. Nice one!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Ooohh that aunt Josephine.
    Absolutely loved, hope they don’t blackmail the wrong person.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. paulmclem says:

    I agree wholeheartedly about the importance of the title. It can easily save you a couple of sentences. Trick is give enough, but not too much, away.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Merry Christmas, Sandra 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Oooh great take – I do like a bit of blackmail!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. I often use my title to explain my stories as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Dear Sandra,
    I love this type of story. Uncovering secrets and other goodies after someone has passed on.
    I think Aunt Josephine would have been interesting to know. I like the way you chose the curtains over the farm. I must start to look at the photographs from a different eye. Thank you for the lesson.
    Enjoy your weekend …
    Isadora 😎

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      Thanks for commenting Isadora, sorry to be so late acknowledging. As I said somewhere up the page, I don’t really know enough about horses to write about them, but I see lots of others did! Have a nice Christmas.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. gahlearner says:

    A crafty lady, that Aunt Josephine. A great twist, made me laugh.

    Like

  28. subroto says:

    I’ve had neighbours like that, though theirs was mostly a non-pecuniary interest 🙂 Nothing escaped their gaze, CIA could learn a thing or two.
    Nice story.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. “And a livelihood”

    Is the narrator a PI or a cop?

    Like

  30. Fantastic story! I loved the reveal.

    Like

  31. Bad Aunt Josephine. I will never look at curtain twitchers quite the same again, wondering if they have a book of secrets, too. Better watch my step. There’s one of them living in my road! An excellent take on the photo prompt, as per usual.
    By the way, I just saw your picture in the January 2017 edition of Writing Magazine, showing you as winning 2nd place in short story category of the Magic Oxygen Literary Prize. It’s such fun when you see a familiar face looking at you out of a magazine! Wishing you hearty congratulations somewhat belatedly.

    Like

  32. Indira says:

    Beautiful take on the prompt. I thought the horses would be the focus on every story this time. Loved it.

    Like

  33. rogershipp says:

    Well done! Aunt Josephine would have been a keeper!

    Like

  34. Michael Wynn says:

    I also want to know what she’s seen. The ultimate curtain twitcher

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      Every street has one. One of my former neighbours obligingly told me that she had her mirrors placed so that she could see who was coming up and down my path. She then realised what she’d said, and assured me it was only in the interests of security! 🙂

      Like

  35. Missed you last week, Sandra–– I messaged Rochelle, worried. Alas, we all take breaks it seems. I didn’t quite get this one, even with the title, but the comments are another piece of short fiction! 😉 Good to see your story this week. Happy holidays!

    Like

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