One Moment in Time – Friday Fictioneers, March 2018

Copyright Fatima Fakier Deria

Beneath the oak tree’s dappled shade, Oliver sips his coffee and remembers the car needs servicing.

Today is a good day, then; any cogent thought processes are a blessing these days.

Louisa waves from the kitchen window.  Sometimes he’s not sure who she is, but he’s happy to accept she’s his wife because she’s kind, gentle and easily moved to tears.

A cloud momentarily eclipses the sun.

Oliver shivers; where’s his jacket?

There is much Oliver doesn’t understand these days, things that worry him.

Like whose car that is, parked on his drive…

That woman in the kitchen will know.

Friday Fictioneers, led by the admirable Rochelle Wisoff-Fields, invites 100 word stories in response to a photo prompt submitted by members of the group.  Why not join us?  100 words though, or else…

About Sandra

I used to cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and wrote fiction and poetry. Now I live on the beautiful Dorset coast, enjoying the luxury of being able to have a cat, cultivating an extensive garden and getting involved in the community. I still write fiction, but only when the spirit moves me - which isn't as often as before. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
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89 Responses to One Moment in Time – Friday Fictioneers, March 2018

  1. Oh the onset of Alzheimer’s. Very moving story, Sandra.

    Like

  2. ceayr says:

    Good grief, Sandra, I am reduced almost to tears.
    In 100 words, what you do approaches genius.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. neilmacdon says:

    Gentle and terrible, Sandra

    Like

  4. There but for the grace of God… Beautifully written Sandra.

    Click to read my 99 words!

    Like

  5. Dear Sandra,

    In few words you’ve touched me to the core. Beautifully written.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  6. jillyfunnell says:

    So sad, Sandra. The final line is heartbreaking. So well written.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Iain Kelly says:

    It is reassuring to know he can still have a nice moment, for however long it may last. Touching vignette Sandra.

    Like

  8. Anita says:

    Moving story. Alzheimer’s is painful. Can feel the helplessness and the dependence…

    Like

  9. James says:

    Stories like this always make me think of Mom whose memory is not doing so well. Unfortunately, Dad is no longer here to take care of her.

    Like

  10. Sue says:

    Beautifully, sensitively written, Sandra

    Like

  11. Beautiful and tragic story, superbly told. The character Oliver put me in mind of the brilliant Oliver Sacks, the man who mistook his wife for a hat.

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      “If a man has lost a leg or an eye, he knows he has lost a leg or an eye; but if he has lost a self—himself—he cannot know it, because he is no longer there to know it.” (Oliver Sacks). One can only hope that dementia sufferers enjoy similar reprieve. Thanks for reading.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Rowena says:

    Oh! This is beautiful, touchingly tragic. I hate Alzheimers. Two of my grandparents had it and it didn’t just steal away their memories, it also changed their personalities and there were times of aggression, fear…pure hell you wouldn’t wish on anyone or their loved ones. You captured the subtlety of those early days exceptionally well.
    xx Rowena

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      It must be difficult watching that relentless deterioration. thanks for reading, Rowena.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Rowena says:

        The other trouble we found was the they varied quite a lot when different family members visited so there was quite a difference of opinion when it came to organizing her care, which fractured the family until a time after her death. Like young children, they also have a witching hour at the end of the day, and my Dad being a stickler for routine and also working, always went at that time, while others saw her when she was fresh in the morning. She was like Jeckyl and Hyde.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Moon says:

    Sad for Oliver. Atleast, he has Louisa to remind him of things, when his memory plays hide-and-seek.
    Beautifully written, as always..,

    Like

  14. k rawson says:

    Authentically captures his lapses in a way that perfectly captures his befuddlement.

    Like

  15. Dale says:

    Brilliantly done, Sandra. Can’t help but wonder which stage my mother-in-law is in. For now, I just get phonecalls giving me shit for locking her up and never visiting her (was there 3 days ago)…
    Such a sad and terrible disease.

    Like

  16. Lynn Love says:

    Absolutely heartbreaking, Sandra. I have to agree with CE – such a brilliant use of so few words. Perfect

    Like

  17. EagleAye says:

    Wonderfully written, Sandra. This is an absolute gem.

    Like

  18. Martin Cororan says:

    ‘A cloud momentarily eclipses the sun,’ brilliantly frames what is happening internally. Great writing.

    Like

  19. A beautifully written story. I was so moved by the words “she’s kind, gentle and easily moved to tears”. They sum up Oliver’s observation of Louisa at that ‘one moment in time’ and reveal the enduring love that she has for her husband as he changes from the man she married to someone altogether different. Wonderful!

    Like

  20. granonine says:

    Breaks my heart. So real, the way he shifts from cogent to confused. So incredibly sad.

    Like

  21. A heartbreaking turn at the end, eliminating his brief moment of lucidity. A hateful disease, that. Kudos, Sandra.

    Like

  22. lisarey1990 says:

    Beautiful take on the prompt. Very touching and filled with emotion.

    Like

  23. shivamt25 says:

    Beautifully written. The last line gave me chills. A terrible condition, Alzheimer’s.

    Like

  24. I’m watching the very early stages of this with friends that I love dearly. It always makes me wonder, “Who’s next?”

    Like

  25. plaridel says:

    very touching story. hopefully, somebody will come up with the cure in the near future.

    Like

  26. So sad. The stage of dementia where there are moments of lucidity and just as quickly they are gone. Beautiuflly written Sandra.

    Like

  27. draliman says:

    Quite heartbreaking, as we see it happen in only a few words.

    Like

  28. athling2001 says:

    I feel so sorry for him. The mind is fascinating, especially memory issues. I love that the ‘woman in the kitchen’ is standing by him.

    Like

  29. Alice Audrey says:

    I get the feeling she cries a lot. Poor thing.

    Like

  30. pennygadd51 says:

    You’ve constructed that story beautifully, around the pivotal line “A cloud momentarily eclipses the sun.” The descriptions are very moving, too.

    Like

  31. Great story, Sandra. It reminds me of my Dad’s last few years.

    Like

  32. Oliver fading… poor him, poor wife… the moving from lucid to confused, I have seen that, and it never improves and only gets worse.

    Like

  33. Liz Young says:

    Oh gods! That’s so sad. Unfortunately I have two people in my life heading that way, and one who has already lost it.

    Like

  34. britlight says:

    Wow. Very well written.

    Like

  35. Laurie Bell says:

    Oh gosh. Fleeting memories. Such a gutwrenching disease. You told this so perfectly from the POV of the one suffering.

    Like

  36. michael1148humphris says:

    You gave this story such a palpable sense of sadness, well done.

    Like

  37. Dan Bohn says:

    Sandra, your stories flow with ease and truth. Our day’s are numbered. My plan is to do this thing with no fear. Thanks for the reality check.

    Like

  38. My God, that was such a powerful and moving story Sandra. Very well written.

    Like

  39. James McEwan says:

    This story captures the situation very well, sad, but nevertheless a very well written story. Reminds me of the times I go upstairs in my house, and don’t remember why!

    Like

  40. gahlearner says:

    This is heart-breaking and so beautifully told. And it is also a reminder, hard as it is for the loved ones who are forced to watch, that not all moments are bad when there is loving care. It keeps the fear at bay and helps with the confusion. At least for a while.

    Like

  41. Sandra, this is pretty much amazing. All of the lines and phrasings just work to convey the ups and downs.

    Like

  42. A very poignant yet beautiful story. He has his loving wife who watches over and cares for him, even though he doesn’t always remember, she’s there.

    Like

  43. Dahlia says:

    Heartbreaking but beautifully penned.

    Like

  44. So gently done in capturing the perspective of someone suffering from Alzheimers. I do think his easy going personality helps, if he was more skittish he’d be afraid of this strange woman and all the things he doesn’t recognise anymore. I loved the dappled shade in the beginning!

    Like

  45. Sarah Ann says:

    Such a poignant and sad tale. This turned out to be many fleeting moments, not just the one. So well done, and frightening.

    Like

  46. Oh my…this one gets you right in the heart!

    Like

  47. magarisa says:

    Heartbreaking and sensitively written.

    Like

I'd love to hear your views; it reassures me I'm not talking to myself.

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