Not All Bad – Friday Fictioneers, February 2017

Copyright Ted Strutz

Copyright Ted Strutz

You’re isolated now, completely on your own; scarcely visible to anyone or anything.

You look in the mirror each morning.  They say what you see depends on your expectations, and although yours are pretty low, the reflection still falls unremittingly, depressingly short.

It’s no longer a crime against humanity to leave home without your bra, and you’re unlikely to scare the horses if you forget your eyeliner.  The world won’t end because you didn’t comb your hair, or apply a slash of lipstick.

Because you go unnoticed everywhere.

And that’s good, you think, examining your haul after today’s leisurely stroll through Harrods.  Excellent, in fact.

 

Late to the party again. Friday Fictioneers, hosted by the genial Rochelle, opens up for business again today.  100 words or thereabouts.  Go on, it won’t kill you!

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About Sandra

I cruise the French waterways with my husband four or five months a year, and write fiction and poetry. I love animals, F1 motor racing, French bread and my husband, though not necessarily in that order.
This entry was posted in Friday Fictioneers, Just Sayin'. Bookmark the permalink.

80 Responses to Not All Bad – Friday Fictioneers, February 2017

  1. It’s not about acquisition, it’s about not getting caught. Well done.

    Like

  2. Dear Sandra,

    Getting older has its perks, doesn’t it? Who’d suspect? Love it.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    PS Better late than not at all.

    Like

  3. neilmacdon says:

    Everyone has a talent. They just have to find it

    Like

  4. I guess there’s an upside to everything. Now that the tea shop is closing, perhaps I should consider this as an alternative job. 🙂

    janet

    Like

  5. jellico84 says:

    Good one. Enjoyed it!

    Like

  6. Iain Kelly says:

    Brilliant Sandra, I admire their positive attitude. The ending gave me a good chuckle. 🙂

    Like

  7. Makes it all worthwhile, doesn’t it?

    Like

  8. I enjoy getting older. All of a sudden so many things don’t matter anymore, it’s quite relaxing.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Dale says:

    Your late is my early… Fun stuff and made me think of the Frankie and Grace episode where they want to buy a pack of smokes but are totally invisible… so Frankie steals them!

    Like

  10. michael1148humphris says:

    What we see is often misleading – but not your story telling – I loved where you took this.

    Like

  11. Lynn Love says:

    I’ve been invisible for years and I don’t mind a bit. I wonder what the cut off age is for us ladies as far as men are concerned? I know it’s well before we’re past our prime!
    Love this tale, Sandra and that knowing wink of a last line is just perfect

    Like

  12. Ha! Well done. Just when I was bemoaning a gimpy knee, more wrinkles and sagging breasts you presented this spectacular idea. Thanks!

    Like

  13. granonine says:

    You had me at going without her bra. . .I wish, but I don’t have the nerve.

    Like

  14. James says:

    So unnoticed, you can steal with impunity.

    Like

  15. ceayr says:

    I laughed aloud here, thank you.
    Very different from your usual, but so clever and created, of course, with a masterly touch.

    Like

  16. Clever take on the prompt!

    Like

  17. wmqcolby says:

    I knew very well a sweet lady who was a travel agent in my town for years. She passed away at the age of 88 a few years ago and she was really neat. She would go to Harrod’s frequently when she was in England and they’d say, “Hi, Shirley!” every time she walked in.

    Story wonderful with attitude and character deluxe. Bravo, Sandra!

    Like

    • Sandra says:

      Thanks Kent. Glad you liked it. I hope your sweet lady resisted the temptations that my character hasn’t. 🙂

      Like

      • wmqcolby says:

        When you said that, I laughed out loud. Shirley Craig was a real character and, even though her tastes weren’t expensive, she did splurge a little. But she splurged more on life than anything else. Shirley was quite the adventuress and you would have adored her. She lived life to the full. She’s missed.

        Like

  18. Great twist, Sandra. I don’t think anyone could begrudge her that haul from Harrods!

    Like

  19. plaridel says:

    i’m afraid she’ll eventually be caught with all cameras around. it’ll just be a matter of time.

    Like

  20. You were describing my laid back days in Mexico until she turned to shoplifting. I wear yoga pants in public now but I haven’t resorted to theft, so all is not lost.

    Like

  21. Michael Wynn says:

    Great tale, Sandra, she seems to be reconciled to her lot and she’s taking only the best by the sounds of it.

    Like

  22. draliman says:

    So true about seeing your own reflection. And a great last paragraph, made me smile! The best thieves are the most unremarkable-looking.

    Like

  23. Liz Young says:

    Surely she’d be less noticable in Harrods if she WAS a bit smarter?

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I wonder if she could somehow steal some self-esteem 🙂 Loved it….

    Like

  25. writelindy says:

    I relate to how she feels invisible and love that she’s learned to appreciate it, using it to her advantage. Another wonderful FF offering.

    Like

  26. Laurie Bell says:

    Oh dear… sounds like she is getting up to no good! 😊 a fun piece. Hope she doesn’t get caught. Being at the copshop with no bra sounds awkward!!

    Like

  27. You always have to play on your strengths.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. tedstrutz says:

    I like this take, Sandra. I couldn’t figure it out at first… now I do.

    Like

  29. subroto says:

    The best things in life are free (or pilfered from Harrods). Hope she has earned enough to retire before the CCTV monitors start taking notice of her, um, skills.

    Like

  30. I love the fact she can go unnoticed and get what she wants! I first read it as a young mother who’s let herself go… (stage of life of the reader perhaps?) Either way, it still worked!

    Like

  31. Wonderful. That last paragraph … what a winner! That story took me down one route and then you turned it around with that haul.
    You might be amused to learn that one of my in-laws, now deceased, used to buy clothes from cheap stores and when she got outside in the street, transfer them into a Harrods bag so that the neighbours would be impressed when they saw her arriving home. So sad.

    Like

  32. What can I say that hasn’t been said in the other comments, Sandra.
    Brilliant write …
    Isadora 😎

    Like

  33. Pretty upmarket shoplifter here. They must be pretty slack at Harrods – but they wouldn’t notice her anyhow, I imagine.

    Like

  34. rgayer55 says:

    Your story was funnier than mine this week, Sandra. Perhaps I’m rubbing off on you. Although, I keep hoping some of your talent will rub off on me.

    Like

  35. Sandra says:

    You’re infectious then, I take it? 🙂 Thank you Russell.

    Like

  36. I remember when I first started to become invisible about ten years ago. It was a little sad then but slowly as it increases it stops mattering and you finally embrace it; some of us, obviously more than others. Lol

    Like

  37. Dahlia says:

    Excellent indeed. Loved it 🙂

    Like

  38. Amy Reese says:

    A-ha! Here’s the upside to being old and invisible. I knew there had to be something. Great storytelling, Sandra. Top notch!

    Like

  39. Indira says:

    So true. Brilliant. My world changed the day I felt like this.

    Like

  40. Oh I loved this very much.

    Liked by 1 person

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